Atherosclerosis is the disease which causes almost all heart attacks, many strokes, and almost all peripheral arterial disease. It is the number one killer in the industrialized world. The culprit lesion is the atherosclerotic plaque, which forms an obstruction to blood flow through an artery. If this occurs in a coronary artery in your heart, the result is angina, or chest pain. In the arteries which supply your legs, it leads to claudication, i.e., pain with walking, or even gangrene. A blood clot or thrombus can develop on these plaques, causing immediate blockage of all blood flow through the artery, and the tissue supplied by the artery dies. In the coronary arteries, this leads to a heart attack or myocardial infarction. In the carotid arteries in your neck, this can lead to stroke.

I started this website to help people with atherosclerosis understand their disease, and to help people without the disease delay its onset. Secondly, I want to promote my ideas. The importance of blood viscosity has been largely ignored by mainstream medical science. This is unfortunate, because viscosity is a basic property of a fluid. When I used to present my work, I found that I always had a more receptive audience when I spoke to educated people who didn't have preconceived notions about what causes atherosclerosis. Those people don't groan when faced with an alternative viewpoint. I have been guilty of mental groaning when faced with an alternative viewpoint, as in 1986, when one of my teachers at LSU School of Medicine in New Orleans told us that one of the Pathology faculty believed that peptic ulcer disease is caused by a bacteria. Of course, we now know that to be true.   

Gregory D. Sloop, M.D., August 5, 2011.


“Longevity is a vascular question.”

“The tragedies of life are largely arterial”

“The greater the ignorance, the greater the dogmatism”

“The philosophies of one age have become the absurdities of the next, and the foolishness of yesterday has become the wisdom of tomorrow.”

Sir William Osler (1849-1919)